Native American Law Section

of the State Bar of Texas

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The Section was formerly known as the American Indian Law Section. At the Section's Meeting during the State Bar of Texas Annual Conference in June 2013, the Section voted to change its name from the American Indian Law Section to the Native American Law Section. In September 2013, the Board of Directors for the State Bar of Texas approved the name change.
Welcome from the Chairman

I invite you to join the Native American Law Section of the State Bar of Texas.

The purpose of the Native American Law Section is to advocate the common professional interest of Native American lawyers and those having an interest in Native American law in Texas. In addition, the section seeks to promote Native American Issues on both public and private forums throughout the State of Texas.

If you have any questions about the Section, please feel free to contact me or the Sections Department at the State Bar of Texas at sections@texasbar.com or by phone at 512-427-1420.

Thank you for your interest in the Native American Law Section of the State Bar of Texas.

Yours truly,
Ron Jackson, Chair
Section Activities

The Native American Law Section of the State Bar of Texas was organized for the purpose of advocating the common professional interests of Native American lawyers and of all Texas lawyers having an interest in or practice that includes American Indian law.

To further its goal of education, the Section has held annual conferences providing legal education (MCLE) at either free or reduced rates for Section members.

Also, members of the Native American Law Section have served as resource witnesses on Native American/American Indian law issues that have been before the Texas legislature, and have provided resource information for state agencies and other entities as needed.

Section members actively represent tribal governments and individuals.
The Section's Objectives

A stated objective of the section’s educational programs and presentations is to educate Texas attorneys and judges about Native American/American Indian law and legal issues in Texas and how those fit into a broader national perspective.

The need for education on Native American/American Indian law and legal issues is particularly pressing for this state, with its growing population of tribally-affiliated Native peoples.

The last U.S. Census shows that Texas now ranks among the five most populous states for an American Indian/Native American population. This includes member of three federally recognized Indian Nations based in Texas, the Alabama-Coushatta, the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo (Tigua), the Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas, and also a growing urban population with tribal affiliations outside of Texas. Additionally, there are more Texas groups currently seeking tribal recognition from the federal government.